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Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Polydactyly and syndactyly are different congenital foot conditions that affect the development of the toes. Polydactyly occurs when there are extra toes on the foot. This condition can vary in severity. Some people having a small extra toe that may not cause significant issues. Others may have a fully formed extra toe that requires surgical removal for functional and cosmetic reasons. Conversely, syndactyly occurs when two or more toes are fused together. This condition ranges from partial fusion, where only the skin connects the toes, to complete fusion, where the bones are fused together. Syndactyly can affect adjacent toes or more distant toes. Polydactyly and syndactyly are generally treated surgically to restore normal toe alignment and function. If you or your child has a congenital foot condition, it is suggested you consult with a podiatrist for proper evaluation and tailored management options. 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Howard Waxman, DPM of Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Daily wear and tear can harm your toes, which are essential for balance and movement. Hammertoe is a toe problem where the middle joint bends upward, making the toe look like a hammer. Toes have muscles on top to stretch them and muscles underneath to bend them. Weak bottom muscles can lead to an upward bend at the middle joint, causing a hammertoe. This can hurt while walking and may affect balance. Symptoms include a bent toe that will not relax, swelling, corns, calluses, pain while walking, and changes in balance or walking style. Other toe issues like claw toes, mallet toes, and bunions exist, often alongside hammertoes. Risk factors include foot shape, medical conditions, like diabetes, arthritis, wrong shoes, and foot injuries. If you have a hammertoe that is causing discomfort, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for guidance.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Howard Waxman, DPM from Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that causes blisters and peeling skin on the feet. This contagious infection is generally treated with topical antifungal medications. If left untreated, athlete's foot can lead to more severe problems than the itching and redness associated with the infection. If ignored, the infection can spread to other parts of the foot, such as the toenails or the soles of the feet. As the condition progresses, it may result in painful blisters, cracks, and open sores, making daily activities like walking or standing uncomfortable. In some cases, untreated athlete's foot can contribute to the development of secondary bacterial infections, which can include swollen and painful feet. These secondary infections can also cause fever and lymph node infections. Some patients also experience allergic reactions to the initial fungal infection, causing blisters on the infected area. Podiatrists can prescribe antifungal medications and provide more information on foot hygiene to effectively quell a case of athlete’s foot. If you suspect you have athlete’s foot, it is suggested that you seek prompt treatment from a podiatrist to treat the infection and prevent it from worsening. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Howard Waxman, DPM from Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Friday, 02 February 2024 00:00

Painful deformities, such as hammertoes, can be treated. Stop living with foot pain, and have beautiful feet again!

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