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January 2021

Achilles tendon ruptures happen when the tendon on the back of the ankle is torn. They primarily occur during activities such as tennis and basketball, which involve pushing off of the ground or sprinting. While the Achilles tendon can tear and may be injured at any age, it most commonly occurs in patients who are in their 30s and 40s. Those who have poor flexibility, an inactive lifestyle, or who only occasionally work out are also at risk for ruptures. Ruptures are often indicated by sudden pain, a sense of being kicked in the back of the leg, a “popping” feeling, and weakness in the heel. Patients who have ruptured their Achilles tendon should consult with a podiatrist for treatment options. Surgery may be necessary to fix the tendon, but time, a cast, and physical therapy may also be used as treatment. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Howard Waxman, DPM of Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 18 January 2021 00:00

Understanding Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot is a common fungal infection known to be contagious. Common symptoms patients can experience with this ailment can include red itchy skin between the toes and on the bottom of the feet.  The skin may also become dry and cracked. The fungus that causes athlete’s foot lives and thrives in warm moist environments that include public swimming pools, shower room floors, and surrounding areas. It is beneficial to wear appropriate shoes while in these areas, in addition to avoid sharing shoes, socks, and towels. There are several treatment options available, and it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine which one is most effective for you.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Howard Waxman, DPM from Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Published in Blog
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

What Are Leg Ulcers?

Leg ulcers are poorly healing sores or wounds that develop on the legs and are often caused by poor circulation. While leg ulcers can be painful, those who have a combination of poor circulation and nerve damage may not feel any pain. However, if you notice symptoms such as open sores, wounds that are increasing in size, pus in the affected area, leg swelling, or enlarged veins, it is important to seek prompt medical attention. Without treatment, leg ulcers can become chronic and lead to serious complications such as infection. If you have ulcers on your lower legs or feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Howard Waxman, DPM from Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

How Gout Can Develop

Common symptoms that are often associated with gout can include severe pain and discomfort in the big toe, as well as swelling and redness. Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints. The body produces uric acid when it breaks down purines, which are naturally found in the body, but they are also found in certain foods and drinks. Some examples of foods that are rich in purines are shellfish, red meat, organ meats such as liver and kidney, processed meat, beverages that contain high fructose corn syrup, and beer. Many patients experience gout attacks that can be so debilitating it may be impossible to walk or complete daily activities. If you are afflicted with bouts of gout, it is strongly suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who can offer various treatment techniques. Although there is no cure for gout there are medications to manage it, as well as lifestyle changes to reduce and possibly eliminate attacks.

 

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact Howard Waxman, DPM from Pleasant Valley Podiatry. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Willoughby Hills and Broadview Heights, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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